Medical articles today

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Significant Sleep Deprivation And Stress Among College Students, USA

Stress about school and life keeps 68 percent of students awake at night - 20 percent of them at least once a week. Stress affects the quality of their sleep far more than alcohol, caffeine or late-night electronics use, a new study shows. Not only that, more than 60 percent of college students have disturbed sleep-wake patterns and many take drugs and alcohol regularly to help them do one or the other. The study of 1, 125 students appears online in the Journal of Adolescent Health. It found that only 30 percent of students sleep at least eight hours a night - the average requirement for young adults. On weeknights, 20 percent of students stay up all night at least once a month and 35 percent stay up until 3 a.

Yawn Alert For Weary Drivers

We've all experienced it after long hours driving, the eyelids getting heavy, a deep yawn, neck muscles relaxing, the urge to sleep, the head nodding down... But, you're hands are still on the wheel and you only just stopped yourself nodding off in time to avoid the oncoming traffic. But what if your car could keep an eye on you while you drive and nudge you when you starting yawning and warn you to pull over and take a break? That's the aim of a new in-car yawn-detection system being developed by an international team in the US and India. Writing in the inaugural issue of the International Journal of Computational Vision and Robotics, Aurobinda Mishra of Vanderbilt University, in Nashville, TN, and colleagues Mihir Mohanty of ITER, in Orissa and Aurobinda Routray of IIT, West Bengal, India, describe a computer program that can tell when you are yawning and could prevent road traffic accidents.

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In Parkinson's Fly Model, Dementia Induced And Blocked

Parkinson's disease is well-known for impairing movement and causing tremors, but many patients also develop other serious problems, including sleep disturbances and significant losses in cognitive function known as dementia. Now researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have modeled Parkinson's-associated dementia for the first time. Scientists showed that a single night of sleep loss in genetically altered fruit flies caused long-lasting disruptions in the flies' cognitive abilities comparable to aspects of Parkinson's-associated dementia. They then blocked this effect by feeding the flies large doses of the spice curcumin.

Physical Activity In Children Improves Their Sleeping Patterns

A research published ahead of print in the Archives of Disease in Childhood reports that every hour of the day children are inactive adds three minutes to the time it takes them to fall asleep. The study indicates that children who fall asleep faster also sleep for longer. Although, it appears one is not the direct consequence of the other. Research shows that approximately 16 percent of parents of school aged children report that their child finds it difficult to get to sleep. There is a connection between poor sleeping patterns in children and inferior school performance. It is also linked to an increased risk of overweight and obesity. Using an activity monitor (called an actigraph) worn for 24 hours, the authors evaluated the daytime activity and sleep patterns of a representative sample of 591 seven year olds.

Every Daytime Sedentary Hour Adds Three Minutes To Time Children Take To Fall Asleep

Every hour of the day children are inactive adds three minutes to the time it takes them to fall asleep, finds research published ahead of print in Archives of Disease in Childhood. Children who fall asleep faster also sleep for longer, the study shows, even though one is not the direct consequence of the other. Research indicates that around 16% of parents of school aged children say that their child finds it difficult to get to sleep. Poor sleep patterns in children have been associated with poorer school performance and an increased risk of overweight and obesity. The authors studied the daytime activity and sleep patterns of a representative sample of 591 seven year olds, using an activity monitor (actigraph) worn for 24 hours.

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Benefits From Upper Airway Surgery For Sleep Apnea Found To Equal CPAP

Adults who struggle with CPAP treatment for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) should be considered candidates for reconstructive surgery on the upper airway, because it holds the same quality-of-life (QOL) benefits but with more permanence. This thesis is in new research published in the August 2009 edition of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy is a highly effective means for treating obstructive sleep apnea, but because it involves a mask and set of hoses, it can be frustrating and uncomfortable for some patients, and compliance may be short-lived. The Australian authors of the study discovered that among moderate-to-severe OSA-suffering patients, those treated through upper airway surgery experienced the same level of long-term quality-of-life improvement as their peers who were treated with CPAP therapy.

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