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Novel Patent Targets The Most Common Sleep Complaint: Chronic Insomnia

Consolidated Research of Richmond, Inc. (CRI) announces the awarding of United States Patent 7, 654, 948 - which is a novel, drug-free system for treating people suffering from the most common sleep complaint: Chronic Insomnia. An estimated 10-20% of the industrialized world's adult population suffers from moderate to severe chronic insomnia, yet, unlike sleep apnea, there is a significant lack of technology addressing this tremendous need. Products based on Consolidated Research's patented technologies will address this market need. Source Consolidated Research of Richmond, Inc.

Possible Pharmacological Target s Identified In Pediatric OSA

Children with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) may one day be able to have an injection or use a throat spray instead of getting their tonsils removed to cure their snoring, according to a new study from the University of Chicago, which found that a specific gene product may be responsible for the proliferation of adenotonsillar tissue that can cause pediatric OSA. "We found that in the tonsil tissues of children with OSA, certain genes and gene networks were over expressed, " said David Gozal, M.D., professor and chair of the Department of Pediatrics, who led the study. "We believe that the results of this gene overexpression is increased proliferation of the adenotonsillar tissues, which in turn can cause partial or complete obstruction of the upper airways during sleep.

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Losing Sleep, Losing Brain?

Chronic and severely stressful situations, like those connected to depression and posttraumatic stress disorder, have been associated with smaller volumes in "stress sensitive" brain regions, such as the cingulate region of the cerebral cortex and the hippocampus, a brain region involved in memory formation. A new study, published by Elsevier in Biological Psychiatry, suggests that chronic insomnia may be another condition associated with reduced cortical volume. Using a specialized technique called voxel-based morphometry, Ellemarije Altena and Ysbrand van der Werf from the research group of Eus van Someren evaluated the brain volumes of persons with chronic insomnia who were otherwise psychiatrically healthy, and compared them to healthy persons without sleep problems.

Study Finds Reduced Brain Gray Matter Concentration In Patients With Severe Obstructive Sleep Apnea

A study in the Feb. 1 issue of the journal SLEEP found gray matter concentration deficits in multiple brain areas of people with severe obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). The study suggests that the memory impairment, cardiovascular disturbances, executive dysfunctions, and dysregulation of autonomic and respiratory control frequently observed in OSA patients may be related to morphological changes in brain structure. Results indicate that in newly diagnosed men with severe OSA, gray matter concentrations were significantly decreased in multiple brain areas, including limbic structures, prefrontal cortices and the cerebellum. Optimized voxel-based morphometry, an automated processing technique for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), was used to characterize structural differences in gray matter by examining the entire brain, rather than a particular region.

What Do Sleep, Diabetes And Red Have In Common With Heart Disease?

OSA: The Sleep Disorder that's Deadly for Your Heart If you're a loud snorer who doesn't feel rested enough during the day, you may be unwittingly putting your heart at risk. That's because you could have untreated Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA), a disorder directly linked to several cardiovascular syndromes that cause premature death. OSA, in which the upper airway becomes blocked repeatedly during sleep, is a condition that affects 24% of men and 8% of women. Over the past 10 years, several studies have linked OSA to high blood pressure. Patients who require three or more medications to control hypertension have an 80% chance of having OSA.

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Examining Link Between Childhood Asthma, Sleep And School Performance

Bradley Hasbro Children's Research Center and Hasbro Children's Hospital researchers have received more than $2.5 million in direct costs from The Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) to study the impact of asthma on the sleep quality and academic performance of young children. The five-year grant will allow pediatric researchers, led by Daphne Koinis-Mitchell, PhD, to evaluate the connection between asthma and allergic rhinitis symptoms (such as sneezing, congestion or a runny nose), sleep quality, and school functioning in urban, elementary school children between the ages of 7 and 9.

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