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UCSF SFGH Project For Diabetes Patients Wins Award For Innovation, Quality

A UCSF/San Francisco General Hospital project that used a novel communication tool to improve health outcomes among diabetes patients was honored recently with a quality leadership award from the California Health Care Safety Net Institute. The Institute, the quality improvement partner of the California Association of Public Hospitals and Health Systems, presented its Quality Leaders Award to innovative programs within California's public hospitals and health systems that aim to meet the needs of diverse communities. At a December 3 award ceremony in Monterey, Calif., the Institute honored San Francisco General Hospital for its Improving Diabetes Efforts Across Language and Literacy (IDEALL) project, which ran from 2003 to 2006 and was based at the UCSF Center for Vulnerable Populations at the hospital.

Handheld Touch Screen Device May Lead To Mobile Fingerprint ID

The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) Hostage Rescue Team had a problem - they needed a small, portable tool to identify fingerprints and faces, but couldn't get anyone interested in building a solution for such a limited market. So they came to the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The FBI told NIST they wanted something more portable than the 20-pound rugged laptop plus fingerprint scanner their hostage rescue teams lug around to aid in their anti-terrorism efforts, and this led to NIST developing a new application for a handheld touch-screen device. The original task given to NIST by the FBI was simply to design and compile the requirements for the software the FBI needed to run on their platform of choice: a handheld device with a touch screen about the size of an index card.

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Rate Of Autism Disorders Climbs To 1 Percent Among 8 Year Olds

Autism and related development disorders are becoming more common, with a prevalence rate approaching 1 percent among American 8-year-olds, according to new data from researchers at the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) School of Public Health and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The study is a partnership between UAB, the CDC and 10 other U.S. research sites. It shows that one in 110 American 8-year-olds is classified as having an autism spectrum disorder (ASD), a 57 percent increase in ASD cases compared to four years earlier. The new findings, published Dec. 18 in the CDC's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR), highlight the need for social and educational services to help those affected by the condition, said Beverly Mulvihill, Ph.

Health Professions United On E-Health, Australia

A high-level meeting of health organisations in Canberra has scoped the development of a robust, patient-centred e-prescribing system through a collaborative partnership between doctors and pharmacists. The roundtable, hosted by the Pharmaceutical Society of Australia and the Royal Australian College of General Practitioners, reaffirmed that e-prescribing of medications can provide substantial benefits to consumers through better medication management and reduced medication errors, as well improved communication between doctors, pharmacists and patients. The meeting however, identified a range of issues which need to be addressed before e-prescribing could be routinely implemented.

Research Finds Happiest US States Match A Million Americans' Own Happiness States

New research by the UK's University of Warwick and Hamilton College in the US into the happiness levels of a million individual US citizens have revealed their personal happiness levels closely correlate with earlier research that ranked the quality of life available in the US's 50 states plus the District of Columbia. This research provides a unique external validation of people's self reported levels of happiness and will be of great value to future economic and clinical research in this field. The new research published in the journal Science is by Professor Andrew Oswald of the UK's University of Warwick and Stephen Wu of Hamilton College in the US.

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Among Middle-Aged Males Shift Working Aggravates Metabolic Syndrome Development

Shift work exposures can accelerate metabolic syndrome (MetS) development among the large population of middle-aged males with elevated alanine aminotransferase (ALT). Elevated serum alanine aminotransferase (e-ALT) is a common abnormality of health examinations in middle-aged working populations. It is unavoidable nowadays that a large number of asymptomatic workers with e-ALT may be asked to do rotating shift work on 24 h production lines. In some previous studies, e-ALT and shift work had been independently assessed for their associations with MetS, which is associated with cardiovascular disease, one of the leading causes of death among working populations.

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