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Tackling Transport And Environment In Africa

Researchers at the University of York are leading an international effort to tackle problems such as traffic congestion, air pollution and road safety in Africa. They are coordinating an international drive to strengthen scientific and technological support to enable the implementation of sustainable transport policies in Sub-Saharan Africa. The Transport and Environment - Science Technology (TEST) Network is led by the University of York's Stockholm Environment Institute and the European branch of the Institute for Transportation and Development Policy, based in Germany. The network involves universities from six Africa countries, UN-Habitat, and the International Forum for Rural Transport and Development (IFRTD).

Hospitalist Recruitment And Retention: Building A Hospital Medicine Program

Recruitment and retention of physicians in all specialties is a national challenge, and it is expected to become even more difficult due to an impending physician shortage. As relative newcomers to the long line of medical specialists, hospitalists pose special challenges. What will convince a hospitalist to join one organization over another? What might prevent a hospitalist from considering a certain assignment? Now, recruiters can benefit from the experience of Kenneth G. Simone, the pioneer who founded the first successful hospitalist program in Maine. In his new book, Hospitalist Recruitment and Retention: Building a Hospital Medicine Program, he reveals what works, what doesn't, and which issues seem to be emerging as the "deal-makers" and "deal-breakers" with these important specialists.

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High-Intensity End-Of-Life Approaches Confer Survival Benefit

Patients admitted to hospitals with higher-intensity end-of-life care live longer than those admitted to hospitals with low-intensity approaches, according to a University of Pittsburgh study available online and published in the February issue of the journal Medical Care. Higher-intensity care refers to greater use of life-sustaining measures such as ICU admission, intubation or mechanical ventilation, kidney dialysis and feeding tubes. The study, led by Amber E. Barnato, M.D., M.P.H., associate professor of medicine, clinical and translational science and health policy, University of Pittsburgh, examined admission records of more than one million patients 65 and older in Pennsylvania hospitals between 2001 and 2005.

Study Finds That Lower Medicare Fees Do Not Increase Volume Of Patient Care

Do physicians provide more services to Medicare patients to make up for lower Medicare fees? With almost 42 million people enrolled in Medicare in the United States in 2008, it's a question that could have a very costly answer. Jack Hadley, professor and senior health services researcher in George Mason University's College of Health and Human Services, along with co-authors James Reschovsky of the Center for Studying Health System Change (HSC), Catherine Corey of the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, and Stephen Zuckerman of The Urban Institute, analyzed thousands of physicians and their Medicare insurance claims to investigate volume-offset behavior, the belief that physicians respond to lower Medicare fees by increasing service volume to make up for potential lost revenue.

Rye More Filling Than Wheat

Wholegrain bread is good and good for you, as most people know. But it is not only the fiber-rich bran, the outer shell of the grain, that is healthful. On the contrary, research at the Lund University Faculty of Engineering shows that bread baked with white rye flour, which is flour made from the inner, white part of the rye kernel, leads to better insulin and blood sugar levels compared with wheat bread with rye bran. White rye flour thus leads to much better values than both regular wheat flour and rye bran. At the same time, much of the bread that is sold in stores today in most countries is in fact baked with wheat flour and bran from various grains.

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Pandemic Preparedness Untested In Ontario Hospitals

One quarter of Ontario hospitals surveyed in a Queen's University-led study do not have an influenza pandemic plan and few plans that do exist have been tested. In addition, key players were not involved in developing the plans, and funding for pandemic preparedness was inadequate. "It's not good enough just to have a plan, you have to test it. You have to know how well it will work in an emergency, " says Dick Zoutman, Queen's professor of Community Health and Epidemiology and lead researcher on the study. "The number should be 100 per cent tested. I'm surprised and concerned we aren't there already in the face of SARS and bird flu." The study's findings are published in the February issue of the American Journal of Infection Control.

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