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Dyax Launches HAE Hope, A New Online Resource For Patients With Hereditary Angioedema

A new, online resource is now available for patients with hereditary angioedema (HAE), their caregivers and physicians. The website, http://www.HAEHope.com, launched today by Dyax Corp. (NASDAQ: DYAX), offers resources to help patients and their families better understand and manage HAE, a rare, genetic disease characterized by episodes of severe and painful swelling. A number of features of HAE Hope are designed to help patients with HAE to better understand and manage the disease. These include, an "Ask the Expert" feature offering responses from an HAE treating physician, key questions to facilitate a discussion with a healthcare professional, and a personalized wallet card identifying a patient as someone with HAE and describing typical disease symptoms to use in case of an emergency.

Industry Corruption, Shoddy Construction Likely Contributed To Haiti Quake Devastation

The death toll in the massive 7.0 magnitude earthquake in Haiti Jan. 12 is expected to continue to rise in the coming days, likely in large part because of corruption and resulting shoddy construction practices in the poor Caribbean nation, according to a University of Colorado at Boulder seismologist. The earthquake hit about 10 miles west of the capitol city of Porte-au-Prince, which has about 2 million inhabitants, said Professor Roger Bilham of CU-Boulder's geological sciences department. The earthquake occurred along what is known as a "strike-slip zone" similar to the San Andreas Fault in California, where one side of a vertical fault moves past another one, he said.

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Strategy To Help Us Find What We're Looking For

When people look for things that are rare, they aren't all that good at finding them. And it turns out that the reverse is also true: When people look for something common, they will often think they see it even when it isn't there. A new report published online on January 14th in Current Biology, a Cell Press publication, offers new insight into why this happens and may suggest some simple methods to help airport security personnel looking for weapons and radiologists looking for tumors get better at their jobs, according to the researchers. "We know that if you don't find it often, you often don't find it, " said Jeremy Wolfe of Harvard Medical School.

Science Translational Medicine Adds 12 New Associate Scientific Advisors

Science Translational Medicine announces the addition of twelve early-career translational scientists who will serve a one-year term as Associate Scientific Advisors for the journal. Starting mid-January, the Associate Scientific Advisors will write Editor's Choice articles and consult with Science Translational Medicine editors on research in their respective fields of study. "The Science Translational Medicine editors selected these twelve participants from more than 30 nominees for their insight into selection of an appropriate article, their clarity of thought, and their diverse backgrounds to cover important fields in clinical and translational science, " said Cynthia Morris, Professor of Medicine, Public Health and Preventative Medicine at Oregon Health & Science University, who helped with the selection.

Elsevier Foundation Announces 600,000 In New Grants

The Elsevier Foundation has announced the 2009 grant recipients, committing a total of $600, 000 to twelve institutions from around the world to support the work of libraries and scholars in science, technology and medicine. The grant recipients were selected from 250 applicants worldwide for their innovation and potential for impact in the developing world, academic workplace and nursing community. Innovative Libraries Six new grants have been awarded under the Innovative Libraries in Developing Countries program. The award recipients include institutions across Africa and Asia, and demonstrate how information resources can be used to address a variety of development issues - emergency management, the environment, boosting authorship and research skills and the distribution of clinical care information: Developing a Service-Oriented Database of Cases of Emergency Management, JINAN University, China 'Librarians Without Borders®

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Sharp Rise In Motorcycle Deaths Since Repeal Of Texas Helmet Law

In Texas, the repeal of a motorcycle helmet law has been followed by a sharp increase in fatal motorcycle crashes, according to a study in the January Southern Medical Journal, official journal of the Southern Medical Association. The journal is published by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, a part of Wolters Kluwer Health, a leading provider of information and business intelligence for students, professionals, and institutions in medicine, nursing, allied health, and pharmacy. "Since the 1997 repeal of the mandatory helmet law in Texas substantially fewer motorcyclists choose to wear protective helmets and substantially more fatal injuries occur per motorcycles registered in the state, " concludes the new study, led by Al Bavon, PhD, and Christina Standerfer, PhD, of the University of Arkansas Clinton School of Public Service, Little Rock.

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