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Feeling Gray, Not Blue, Using Colors To Describe Emotions

People with anxiety and depression are most likely to use a shade of gray to represent their mental state. Researchers writing in the open access journal BMC Medical Research Methodology describe the development of a color chart, The Manchester Color Wheel, which can be used to study people's preferred pigment in relation to their state of mind. Peter Whorwell, Professor of Medicine and Gastroenterology at University Hospital South Manchester, worked with a team of researchers from the University of Manchester, UK, to create an instrument that would allow people a choice of colors in response to questions. He said, "Colors are frequently used to describe emotions, such as being 'green with envy' or 'in the blues'.

High Sensitivity To Stress Isn't Always Bad For Children

Children who are especially reactive to stress are more vulnerable to adversity and have more behavior and health problems than their peers. But a new longitudinal study suggests that highly reactive children are also more likely to do well when they're raised in supportive environments. The study, by scientists at the University of British Columbia, the University of California, San Francisco, and the University of California, Berkeley, appears in the January/February 2010 issue of the journal Child Development. "Parents and teachers may find that sensitive children, like orchids, are more challenging to raise and care for, but they can bloom into individuals of exceptional ability and strength when reared in a supportive, nurturing, and encouraging environment, " according to Jelena Obradovi─, an assistant professor in the School of Education at Stanford University (Dr.

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Depression In Pregnancy Tied To Antisocial Behavior In Offspring During Teens

Children from urban areas whose mothers suffer from depression during pregnancy are more likely than others to show antisocial behavior, including violent behavior, later in life. Furthermore, women who are aggressive and disruptive in their own teen years are more likely to become depressed in pregnancy, so that the moms' history predicts their own children's antisocial behavior. That's the conclusion of a new longitudinal study conducted by researchers at Cardiff University, King's College London, and the University of Bristol. The research appears in the January/February 2010 issue of the journal Child Development. The study considered the role of mothers' depression during pregnancy by looking at 120 British youth from inner-city areas.

Early Abuse Tied To More Depression In Children

Although children can be depressed for many reasons, new evidence suggests that there are physiological differences among depressed children based on their experiences of abuse before age 5. Early abuse may be especially damaging due to the very young age at which it occurs. Those are the findings of a new study of low-income children that was conducted by researchers at the University of Minnesota and the University of Rochester, Mt. Hope Family Center. The study appears in the January/February 2010 issue of the journal Child Development. Children who experience maltreatment, including physical, sexual, and emotional abuse or neglect, grow up with a lot of stress.

Learning Curves: Bioethics Memory Aid Can Help Assess Patient Decision-Making Capacity In Medical Emergencies

Physicians in training and bioethicists at Johns Hopkins have created an easy-to-remember checklist to help medical students and clinicians quickly assess a patient's decision-making capacity in an emergency. A report on the acronym CURVES, and how to use it, will be published in the February issue of CHEST. CURVES stands for Choose and Communicate, Understand, Reason, Value, Emergency and Surrogate. Doctors and students easily memorize mnemonic devices, and applying this one will help them determine whether a patient is able to make decisions in emergency situations fraught with stress and uncertainty. The memory aid is designed to uphold the core bioethical principles of patient autonomy and assurance of benefit, says Joseph Carrese, M.

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Canadian Study Links Parenting To Children's Relationships To Hobbies

Parents take heed: children and young adults are more likely to pursue sports, music or other pastimes when given an opportunity to nurture their own passion. According to a three-part study led by Genevieve Mageau, a psychology professor at the Universite de Montreal, parental control can predict whether a child develops a harmonious or obsessive passion for a hobby. Published in the latest Journal of Personality, the study was a collaboration with scientists from the Universite de Montreal, the Universite du Quebec a Montreal and McGill University. "We found that controlling adults can foster obsessive passion in their children by teaching them that social approval can only be obtained through excellence, " says Dr.

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