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Younger Doctors Recommend Kidney Transplantations Earlier

Compared with veteran doctors, recent medical school graduates are more likely to refer chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients for kidney transplantation before their patients require dialysis, according to a paper being presented at the American Society of Nephrology's 42nd Annual Meeting and Scientific Exposition in San Diego, CA. These findings suggest that more recent medical training is associated with early referral. This is potentially due to a lack of knowledge about preemptive kidney transplantation among more veteran physicians. Advanced CKD patients who receive a kidney transplant before they require dialysis (a "preemptive" transplantation) tend to live longer, have better transplanted kidney function and improved quality of life, than patients who require dialysis before a transplant.

Women Are At Greater Risk Than Men Of Graft Loss After Undergoing Liver Transplantation For Hepatitis C-related Liver Disease

Although women with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection are at lower risk for developing cirrhosis, researchers who compared outcomes for men and women after having liver transplantation found that women have a significantly increased risk of overall graft loss and graft loss from recurrent HCV than men. "Given the higher rate of graft losses due to recurrent HCV and higher risk of developing advanced HCV, our results highlight the need for close monitoring of HCV disease progression after liver transplantation and the appropriate timing of interventions, such as HCV treatment, " said Jennifer Lai, MD, lead investigator for the study.

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Sickle Cell Disease In Adults Reversed By Blood Stem-Cell Transplant Regimen

A modified blood adult stem-cell transplant regimen has effectively reversed sickle cell disease in 9 of 10 adults who had been severely affected by the disease, according to results of a National Institutes of Health study in the Dec. 10 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine. The trial was conducted at the NIH Clinical Center in Bethesda, Md., by NIH researchers at the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI), and the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. "This trial represents a major milestone in developing a therapy aimed at curing sickle cell disease, " said NIDDK Director Griffin P.

Controversial Kidney Transplant Technique Could Provide Lifeline For Very Ill Patients

Surgeons who successfully performed kidney transplants after removing small cancerous and benign masses from the donated organs, have published their results in the December issue of the urology journal BJUI. The technique, carried out by US surgeons at the University of Maryland School of Medicine in Baltimore, could offer a vital lifeline to patients with end-stage renal disease as well as increasing the supply of viable organs. "Transplanting a living donor kidney which has been affected by a renal mass is controversial and considered a high risk" says co-author Dr Michael W Phelan. "However the ongoing shortage of organs from deceased donors, and the high risk of dying while waiting for a transplant, prompted five donors and recipients to push ahead with surgery after the small masses were found in the donor kidneys.

Group Chats About Kidney Transplantation Increase Loved Ones' Willingness To Donate

Get-togethers with a kidney disease patient's family and friends can improve their willingness to consider donation, according to a paper presented at the American Society of Nephrology's 42nd Annual Meeting and Scientific Exposition in San Diego, CA. The findings indicate that group-education of patients' relatives and friends is an effective way to help alleviate the organ shortage and increase living donations. While kidney transplantation from a living donor is the best treatment option for most patients with kidney failure, living donation is often overlooked because family members and friends are not aware that they could be potential donors and patients are reluctant or embarrassed to ask their loved ones for a kidney.

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Earlier Not Necessarily Better When Receiving A Kidney Transplant

Pre-dialysis transplant recipients with a high level of kidney function don't benefit from their transplant more than pre-dialysis recipients with low level kidney function, according to a paper presented at the American Society of Nephrology's 42nd Annual Meeting and Scientific Exposition in San Diego, CA. The findings indicate that there may be no urgency for kidney disease patients to get a transplant while their kidneys are still somewhat healthy. Kidney disease patients with pre-dialysis transplants ("preemptive" transplantation) tend to live longer and have higher functioning transplants than post-dialysis transplant recipients. However, researchers didn't know if higher kidney function among pre-dialysis recipients improves patients' long-term health.

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