Health and Fitness

Mizzou Scientist Creates A Chicken Substitute, Providing A Low-Cost, Tasty Way To Add Soy To The Diet

Sure, some delicacies might taste just like chicken, but they usually feel and look much different. Soy meat alternatives, such as the soy burger, have become more popular recently, with increased sales of eight percent from 2007 to 2008. Now, scientists at the University of Missouri have created a soy substitute for chicken that is much like the real thing. The new soy chicken also has health benefits, including lowering cholesterol and maintaining healthy bones. Fu-Hung Hsieh, an MU professor of biological engineering and food science in the College of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources and the College of Engineering, is leading the project to create a low-cost soy substitute for chicken. His research, funded by the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the Illinois-Missouri Biotechnology Alliance, has led to a process that does more than just add color and flavor to soy. Hsieh has developed a process that makes the soy product simulate the fibrous qualities of a chicken breast.

Hospital For Special Surgery Launches Quality Research Center

Patients with orthopedic and autoimmune conditions expect Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS)--because of its leadership role--to deliver the highest quality care. To further accomplish this mission, HSS is announcing the creation of a Quality Research Center with an innovative structure for applying research methodologies to health-care quality issues. Physicians, nurses and biostatisticians throughout the institution will now, through this new initiative, work together on conducting research in areas that impact on quality of patient care and patient safety. The research generated from the Center will enable HSS to improve best practices to benefit its patients and also allow HSS to provide evidence-based data that can be published and disseminated to other institutions. "We have been conducting research on quality initiatives for many years within nursing, risk management, quality assurance, epidemiology and several other departments, " said Steven Magid, M.D., professor of clinical medicine and chair of the newly-formed Quality Research Center.

Walking Linked To Eased Osteoarthritis

"Progressive walking" combined with glucosamine sulphate supplementation has been shown to improve the symptoms of osteoarthritis. Researchers writing in BioMed Central's open-access journal Arthritis Research and Therapy found that patients who walked at least two bouts of 1500 steps each on three days of the week reported significantly less arthritis pain, and significantly improved physical function. Dr Kristiann Heesch worked with a team of researchers from The University of Queensland, Australia, to carry out the trial in 36 osteoarthritis patients (aged 42 - 73 years). All patients received the dietary supplement for six weeks, after which they continued to take the supplement during a 12-week progressive walking program. The program, called Stepping Out, includes a walking guide; a pedometer; weekly log sheets and a weekly planner, all intended to help patients adopt the exercise regime. Seventeen patients were randomly assigned to walk five days per week, while the remaining 19 were instructed to walk three days a week.

Exercise Program Associated With Denser Bones, Lower Fall Risk In Older Women

Women age 65 or older assigned to an exercise program for 18 months appeared to have denser bones and a reduced risk of falls, but not a reduced cardiovascular disease risk, compared with women in a control group. Wolfgang Kemmler, Ph.D., and colleagues at Freidrich-Alexander University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Erlangen, Germany, studied a total of 246 older women. Half of the women exercised four days per week with special emphasis on intensity while the other half participated in a wellness program that focused on well-being. Among the 227 women who completed the study, the 115 who exercised had higher bone density in their spine and hip, and also had a 66 percent reduced rate of falls. Fractures due to falls were twice as common in the controls vs. the exercise group (12 vs. six). However, the 10-year risk of cardiovascular disease-assessed using the Framingham Risk Calculator, which incorporates factors such as cholesterol level, blood pressure and presence of diabetes-decreased in both groups and did not differ between the two.

Cartilage Replacement Using The Body's Own Cells: Fast, Affordable And A Perfect Fit

Injuries to joints and cartilage can have serious consequences, including osteoarthritis. Cartilage degeneration in joints is a widespread disease in Germany and worldwide. Prof. Dr. Prasad Shastri is an expert in tissue engineering (TE), tissue construction and tissue cultivation using the body's own cells. He is Professor of Biofunctional Macromolecular Chemistry at the Centre for Biological Signalling Studies (BIOSS), a Cluster of Excellence at the University of Freiburg, where he has been researching for the last year. Together with peers from Maastricht and Nashville, he has developed a fast and cost-efficient method for producing sufficient amounts of bone and cartilage tissue using the body's own cells. Damage to larger joints such as knees, feet, hips and shoulders is often the beginning of a painful process during which mobility continues to decrease. Because cartilage cannot regenerate after the body has stopped growing, defects caused by injuries and "wear and tear" cannot be absorbed by producing new cartilage.

New Technology Aims To Repair The After-Effects Of Gum Disease

Advances in tissue engineering are offering the promise of being able to restore lost bone and gum tissue following periodontal disease. About a third of the population are affected by chronic inflammatory gum disease which can result in loss of the bone and other tissues that support our teeth. Professor Saso Ivanovski, Listerine Chair in Periodontology at Griffith's School of Dentistry and Oral Health, said even when the infection or inflammation was brought under control, people can be left with an unsightly appearance and poor function. The colloquial expression 'long in the tooth' is often used to describe people and things of a significant age, however the unsightly effects of severe gum disease and gum retraction leading to wobbly teeth are not confined to the elderly. "Smoking, uncontrolled diabetes, stress and genetic susceptibility are some of the risk factors for gum disease, which affects people of all ages, " he said. Advanced disease affects about 10 per cent of the population.

Animal Models That Help Translate Regenerative Therapies From Bench To Bedside

Clinical testing and development of novel therapies based on advances in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine that will one day enable the repair and replacement of diseased or damaged human muscle, bone, tendons, and ligaments depends on the availability of good animal models. The highlights of a recent workshop that explored the need for and current status of animal models for musculoskeletal regenerative medicine are presented in a special issue of Tissue Engineering, Part B: Reviews, a peer-reviewed journal published by Mary Ann Liebert, Inc. The issue is available free online ( http://www.liebertpub.com/ten ). The production of specially engineered tissues to restore the function and viability of cartilage or meniscus in the knee, for example, or of degenerating intervertebral discs in the spine, will likely one day be commonplace. In the meantime, however, there is substantial need for better and standardized animal models for the development and testing of these innovative techniques.

Cracking The Code On Common Wrist Injury - American Academy Of Orthopaedic Surgeons

The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) recently approved and released an evidence-based clinical practice guideline on the Treatment of Distal Radius Fractures. A distal radius fracture - one of the most common fractures in the body - usually occurs as a result of a fall. For example, a fall may cause someone to land on his or her outstretched hands, breaking the larger of the two bones in the forearm, near the wrist. - In 2007, more than 261, 000 people visited the emergency room due to a distal radius fracture. "The Academy created this clinical practice guideline to improve patient care for those sustaining a distal radius fracture, " stated David Lichtman, MD, chair of this guideline workgroup. "This serves as a point of reference and an educational tool for both primary care physicians and orthopaedic surgeons, streamlining possible treatment processes for this ever-so common problem, " he added. "While a wide range of treatment options are available, they should always be tailored to individual patients after discussions with their orthopaedic surgeons.

QRxPharma Initiates Second Pivotal Phase 3 Study Of MoxDuo TM IR Dual-Opioid TM For NDA Submission

QRxPharma Limited (ASX: QRX and OTCQX: QRXPY) announced initiation of its second pivotal Phase 3 registration trial (Study 009) to evaluate analgesic efficacy and safety of MoxDuo™ IR, a patented 3:2 ratio fixed dose combination of morphine plus oxycodone. This two-arm study will compare the effectiveness and safety of a flexible MoxDuo™ IR dose regimen to a fixed low dose for managing moderate to severe pain in patients who have undergone total knee replacement surgery. The Company expects to complete dosing in Q3 2010 in preparation for filing a New Drug Application (NDA) with the US Food and Drug Administration in Q4 2010. MoxDuo™ IR targets the acute pain market, a $2.5 billion segment of over $7 billion spent annually on prescription opioids in the US. "In support of our Phase 3 program, clinical trials conducted to date have consistently demonstrated MoxDuo™ IR achieves as good or better pain relief with fewer incidences of moderate-severe side effects than morphine, oxycodone or Percocet®

Little Effect Of Soy Isoflavones On Bone Loss In Postmenopausal Women: ISU Multi-Center Study

A previous six-month study by Iowa State University researchers had indicated that consuming modest amounts of soy protein, rich in isoflavones, lessened lumbar spine bone loss in midlife, perimenopausal women. But now an expanded three-year study by some of those same researchers does not show a bone-sparing effect in postmenopausal women who ingested soy isoflavone tablets, except for a modest effect at the femoral (hip) neck among those who took the highest dosage. The multi-center clinical trial of 224 postmenopausal women -- led by D. Lee Alekel, professor of nutrition and interim associate director of the Nutrition and Wellness Research Center (NWRC) at Iowa State, and supported by the National Institute of Arthritis, Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, one of the research institutes of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) -- was the longest ever conducted on the effects of soy isoflavones on bone mineral density (BMD). It compared the effects of either ingesting daily 80-mg daily or 120-mg soy isoflavone tablets, compared to placebo tablets on BMD and other health outcomes.

Health and Fitness © Padayatra Dmytriy
Designer Padayatra Dmytriy