Health and Fitness

SOMA 250 MG Shown To Significantly Improve Functionality And Reduce Disability In Patients With Low Back Pain In Three Days

A recent analysis of two pivotal clinical trials in patients with acute low back pain (ALBP) who were treated with SOMA® (carisoprodol) 250 mg showed significantly improved functionality and reduced disability after three days of treatment, as measured by the Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire (RMDQ). This analysis is being presented this week at the 26th annual meeting of the American Academy of Pain Medicine in San Antonio, TX. In addition, a recent review of published literature indicates that SOMA 250 mg is the only skeletal muscle relaxant proven to significantly improve functionality in patients with acute low back pain as measured by the RMDQ. SOMA 250 mg is indicated for the relief of discomfort associated with acute, painful musculoskeletal conditions. "This outcomes data differentiates SOMA 250 mg among the diverse treatment choices for patients with acute low back pain, " said Steven M. Simon, MD, RPh, Clinical Assistant Professor, University of Kansas and Kansas City, University of Medicine and Biosciences.

Study Reveals Predictors Of Long-term Opioid Use For Back Pain

Despite limited evidence of long-term success in using opioid pain medications for chronic low back pain, opioid prescribing has increased in recent years for back pain and other non-cancer pain indications. The implications are controversial as published studies provide little evidence indicating which patients will benefit from long-term opioid treatment. New research, published in The Journal of Pain, identifies predictors of long-term opioid use among patients with chronic back pain caused by lumbar spine conditions. Participants were recruited from 13 spine specialty centers in 11 states and totaled 2, 110. Forty-two percent reported using opioids for pain from their spine condition and a third said they take opioids every day. From their analysis of the demographic, medical and social characteristics of study participants, the researchers found that nonsurgical treatment and smoking independently predicted continued long-term opioid use and pain severity did not. The authors noted that smoking can be a marker for substance abuse disorders, which was not a characteristic evaluated in the sample due to limitations for measuring alcohol or drug use.

Cymbalta R Significantly Reduced Chronic Low Back Pain In New Study

In a new study, 60 mg of Cymbalta(R) (duloxetine HCl) taken once daily significantly reduced chronic low back pain, as measured by the Brief Pain Inventory (BPI) average pain rating, compared with placebo.(1) The data were presented at the annual meeting of the American Academy of Pain Medicine (AAPM) in San Antonio, Texas. A total of 401 patients participated in the 12-week, double-blind, placebo-controlled study, designed to assess the efficacy of duloxetine 60 mg once daily on the reduction of pain severity in patients with chronic low back pain. In the study, duloxetine-treated patients experienced a statistically significantly greater improvement on BPI average pain scale compared with placebo in chronic low back pain (p<0.005). The most common adverse events (those occurring in more than 5 percent of study participants) in duloxetine-treated patients were nausea, headache, dry mouth, constipation and dizziness. A total of 41 patients in the study discontinued due to adverse events - 30 in the duloxetine-treated group and 11 in the placebo-treated group.

Smooth And Integrated Movement Patterns Can Help Individuals With Back Pain

Many people with back pain do not know what is causing it and they do not receive effective treatment, but learning to move in a more integrated way makes a big difference, reveals research from the Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Sweden. "People with long-term back pain often protect themselves by unconsciously limiting their movements, " says physiotherapist Christina SchГ n-Ohlsson. "Such inefficient movement patterns gradually become habituated even though the original injury or strain is no longer present." The answer to the problem is sensory motor learning, where patients are guided to find out how they are moving and how they can free themselves from self-imposed limitations. This process leads patients to develop their bodily awareness and to trust in their bodily sensations again. In one of the studies 40 patients were randomly divided into two groups to compare experiences of two different types of treatment: exercise therapy and sensory motor learning.

Heavy Backpacks Affect Children's Spines

Heavy backpacks place a measurable strain on the spines of children, with heavier loads causing greater spinal strain and increased back pain, reports a study in the January 1 issue of Spine. The journal is published by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, a part of Wolters Kluwer Health, a leading provider of information and business intelligence for students, professionals, and institutions in medicine, nursing, allied health, and pharmacy. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans show compression of the spinal discs and spinal curvature caused by typical school backpack loads in children, according to Dr. Timothy Neuschwander of University of California, San Diego, and colleagues. Backpacks' Effects on Disc Height and Spinal Curve Linked to Back Pain The study included eight children, mean age 11 years. A special upright MRI scanner was used to image the children's spines in standing position-first with an empty backpack, then with increasing weights of 9, 18, and 26 lb. These weights represented about 10, 20, and 30 percent of the children's body weight.

Guideline: Widely Used Device For Pain Therapy Not Recommended For Chronic Low Back Pain

A new guideline issued by the American Academy of Neurology finds that transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation (TENS), a widely used pain therapy involving a portable device, is not recommended to treat chronic low-back pain pain that has persisted for three months or longer because research shows it is not effective. The guideline is published in the December 30, 2009, online issue of Neurology® , the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. The guideline determined that TENS can be effective in treating diabetic nerve pain, also called diabetic neuropathy, but more and better research is needed to compare TENS to other treatments for this type of pain. Research on TENS for chronic low-back pain has produced conflicting results. For the guideline, the authors reviewed all of the evidence for low-back pain lasting three months or longer. Acute low-back pain was not studied. The studies to date show that TENS does not help with chronic low-back pain. All but one of the studies excluded people with known causes of low-back pain, such as a pinched nerve, severe scoliosis (curving of the spine), severe spondylolisthesis (displacement of a backbone or vertebra) or obesity.

How To Prevent Pain In The Neck, Back And Shoulders This Holiday Season

To most of us the holiday season is all about tradition, fun, and family, but if we're not careful, the holidays can also be a pain in the neck-literally-says the American Physical Therapy Association (APTA). Typical holiday activities, such as shopping "till you drop, " lifting heavy boxes and presents, and countless hours of cooking and baking, can cause muscles to work harder than usual, many times resulting in neck, shoulder, and back pain. This holiday season APTA recommends taking precautions-from distributing the weight of shopping bags equally on both sides of your body to lifting boxes carefully-in order to keeps aches and injuries at bay. "The added demands of the holidays stresses the body, which may increase the risk of injuries related to the extra activities, " says APTA spokesperson and physical therapist E. Anne Reicherter, PT, DPT, PhD. "Using proper body mechanics can help prevent muscle and joint discomfort this holiday season." Lifting - Test an object's weight before attempting to lift heavy packages or luggage.

American Society Of Anesthesiologists Urges Americans To Fight Back Against Pain

Whether the result of injury, illness or a chronic condition, 70 million Americans experience pain annually. The individual pain sufferer may experience a diminished quality of life, lack of mobility and added stress. For the country as a whole, pain has far-reaching cost implications. It is estimated that more than 140 million work days are lost because of back pain. (1, 2) As a result of chronic pain and the loss in productivity that it causes, approximately $60-100 billion is wasted each year. (3) To help fight this debilitating condition and combat its detrimental impact, the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) is offering practical ways for sufferers to take an active role in the treatment of pain. The ASA wants to ensure patients are informed about their treatment options and is offering a series of tips to empower the patient as he/she works with a physician to treat the pain. Anesthesiologists are pain medicine specialists with extensive experience diagnosing and treating both acute and chronic pain conditions such as arthritis, back and neck pain, cancer pain, nerve pain, migraine headaches, shingles and pain caused by AIDS.

New Interdisciplinary Approach To Treating Lower Back Pain Unveiled By MSU Researcher

Using a branch of science that crosses disciplines to study complex problems, a Michigan State University researcher is introducing a new way to understand and treat lower back pain, a condition affecting more than 40 million Americans and costing billions of dollars each year. N. Peter Reeves, a researcher in Osteopathic Surgical Specialties in MSU's College of Osteopathic Medicine, is studying the spine using systems science, which became popular in the early 20th century. With a systems approach, it is possible to study complex systems in a way that not only includes their parts but also how the parts interact to affect the entire system. "The attractiveness of the systems approach is that it allows the research community to share results and integrate data to provide a coherent picture of the spine system, which in turn can be used to better diagnose and treat back pain, " Reeves said. The problem with current clinical approaches is they focus on a reductionist method, in which a medical problem is broken down into smaller parts to isolate elements of the condition, Reeves said.

Rat Model Provides Insights Into Sciatica

A newly developed animal model for the painful nerve condition known as sciatica should help researchers diagnose and treat it, according to Duke University bioengineers and surgeons. Sciatica is not a single disorder, but rather a diverse range of symptoms, such as numbness or pain from the lower back to the feet, radiating leg pain or difficulty in controlling the leg. It is often caused by compression, or pinching, of any of the five nerve roots that combine to make up the sciatic nerve. These roots are the parts of the nerve that pass through openings in the spine to the spinal cord. Surgical simulation of nerve compression in rats was led by Mohammed Shamji, a neurosurgery resident and recent Ph.D. graduate working in the laboratory of senior researcher Lori Setton, professor of biomedical engineering and surgery at Duke's Pratt School of Engineering. Shamji and post-doctoral research fellow Kyle Allen observed that the animals' gait became asymmetric, and that they over-responded to temperature changes and touch in their limbs after the surgery.

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