Health and Fitness

Antimicrobial Antibodies In Celiac Disease: Trick Or Treat?

Anti-microbial antibody formation has been reported in celiac disease. Relatively high positivity rates were observed for the conventional antibodies, for example, ASCA, anti-OmpW, and anti-I2, and they were known to decrease after a successful gluten free-diet. The importance of newly discovered inflammatory bowel disease-associated antibodies (including anti-glycan antibodies and anti-OMP) in celiac disease is not sure. The presence of anti-microbial antibodies in relation to clinical presentation of the disease and NOD2/CARD15 mutations was also not investigated. A research article published in the World Journal of Gastroenterology addresses this problem. Hungarian researchers from the University of Debrecen in Debrecen and the Semmelweis University in Budapest have shown in a well-characterized CD cohort that the anti-glycan antibody positivity is a common feature of celiac disease at the time of diagnosis and is lost after long-term gluten-free diet. The positivity rate and titers at diagnosis are as high as observed in Crohn's disease.

MEDA Receives FDA Approval Of New ASTEPRO R azelastine HCl Nasal Spray 0.15 , The First And Only Once-Daily Nasal Antihistamine

Meda Pharmaceuticals Inc. announced that the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved ASTEPRO(R) (azelastine HCl) Nasal Spray 0.15%, for the treatment of the symptoms of seasonal and perennial allergic rhinitis (SAR and PAR). New ASTEPRO Nasal Spray 0.15% is the first nasal antihistamine to offer convenient once-daily dosing for patients who suffer from seasonal allergies. ASTEPRO Nasal Spray 0.15% relieves rhinitis symptoms, including nasal congestion, without an added decongestant such as pseudoephedrine and is formulated with azelastine, a leading nasal antihistamine in the treatment of seasonal rhinitis in the U.S. The product will be available in pharmacies in early October. Approximately 40 million people in the U.S. suffer from seasonal and perennial allergic rhinitis. Seasonal allergic rhinitis occurs during a specific season, commonly in the fall and spring, and is caused by outdoor allergy triggers such as tree, grass or ragweed pollen. Perennial allergic rhinitis occurs throughout the year and is typically caused by indoor allergens such as dust mites, mold and animal dander.

New Non-Drowsy CLARITIN R 12-Hour Gets Allergy Sufferers Through Their Busy Day

Schering-Plough Corporation (NYSE: SGP) today announced the introduction of CLARITIN 12-Hour, the only 12-hour allergy medicine found in the allergy aisle. New CLARITIN 12-Hour lasts all day and provides effective, non-drowsy relief from the worst indoor and outdoor allergy symptoms. The product is available for adults and children ages six and up. "New CLARITIN 12-Hour offers the proven allergy relief people have relied on for years, with the added flexibility for people who want more control of their treatment, " said Dr. John O'Mullane, group vice president, research and development, Schering-Plough Consumer Health Care. "Allergy sufferers can choose to treat their allergy symptoms for 12 or 24 hours depending on their individual needs." Until now, sufferers shopping the allergy aisle had to choose between 4-6 hour products, which could cause drowsiness, or products offering 24 hours of relief. However, according to a recent study, 34% of allergy sufferers want something in between (1).

Tips For Dealing With Fall Allergies From DampRid

For America's 60 million seasonal allergy sufferers, fall can be one of the most difficult times of year as ragweed begins to release its pollen into the air and mold and fungus spores increase due to the decay of leaves and other plants. Each ragweed plant produces one billion pollen grains per average season. This generally continues until the first frost, usually in October. According to the Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America, allergies are considered the fifth leading chronic disease and are a major cause of work absenteeism, resulting in nearly four million missed or lost workdays each year. Seasonal allergies can be further aggravated by poor air quality inside the home. Allergy sufferers can begin to take control of their condition by improving the quality of their home environment and create cleaner, fresher air. Moisture control is the key to preventing mold and mildew growth and the resulting allergens from forming. Removing excess moisture also protects against moisture damage to clothing, furniture and valuables and eliminates musty odors.

Flu Advice For Asthma And Allergy Sufferers

According to the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, 67% of children who died with the new H1N1 flu virus had at least one high-risk medical condition. Any individual with an underlying respiratory condition such as asthma is more likely to experience serious health problems if he or she contracts the flu, according to the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology (AAAAI). "As with seasonal influenza, people with chronic respiratory diseases such as COPD and asthma are more vulnerable to the adverse consequences of H1N1 infection. Recent data suggest that children with asthma are especially at risk and should heed the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommendations regarding vaccination and treatment options, " said AAAAI Executive Vice President Thomas B. Casale, MD, FAAAAI. Is it flu or is it allergies? For parents of children with asthma or allergies, telling the difference between these allergic disease symptoms and the seasonal flu or H1N1 may be a bit difficult.

Critical Molecule To Celiac Disease, Possibly Other Autoimmune Disorders, Pinpointed By UM Scientists

It was nine years ago that University of Maryland School of Medicine researchers discovered that a mysterious human protein called zonulin played a critical role in celiac disease and other autoimmune disorders, such as multiple sclerosis and diabetes. Now, scientists have solved the mystery of zonulin's identity, putting a face to the name, in a sense. Scientists led by Alessio Fasano, M.D., have identified zonulin as a molecule in the human body called haptoglobin 2 precursor. Pinpointing the precise molecule that makes up the mysterious protein will enable a more detailed and thorough study of zonulin and its relationship to a series of inflammatory disorders. The discovery was reported in a new study by Dr. Fasano, published the week of September 7, 2009 in the online version of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Dr. Fasano is a professor of pediatrics, medicine and physiology and director of the Mucosal Biology Research Center and the Center for Celiac Research at the University of Maryland School of Medicine.

Daycare Doubles Early Respiratory Problems, Does Not Prevent Later Asthma And Allergy

New research hints that the common belief that kids who go to daycare have lower rates of asthma and allergy later in life might be nothing more than wishful thinking. While young children in daycare definitely do get more illnesses and experience more respiratory symptoms as a result, any perceived protection these exposures afford against asthma and allergy seem to disappear by the time the child hits the age of eight. "We found no evidence for a protective or harmful effect of daycare on the development of asthma symptoms, allergic sensitization, or airway hyper-responsiveness at the age of eight years, " wrote Johan C de Jongste, M.D., Ph.D., of Erasmus University in the Netherlands and principle investigator of the study. "Early daycare was associated with more airway symptoms until the age of four years, and only in children without older siblings, with a transient decrease in symptoms between four and eight years." The results are published in the September 15 issue of the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, a journal of the American Thoracic Society.

Introduction Of Solid Foods And Allergic Reactions - American Academy Of Pediatrics

Late introduction of solid foods may increase the risk of allergic sensitization to food and inhalant allergens. In the study, "Age at the Introduction of Solid Foods During the First Year and Allergic Sensitization at Age 5 Years, " published in the January issue of Pediatrics, researchers examined the diets and allergic sensitivities of 994 children with susceptibility to type 1 diabetes. Results indicate that late introduction of solid foods was associated with increased allergic sensitization to food and inhalant allergens. Eggs, wheat and oats were most commonly related to food sensitization, while potatoes and fish were strongly associated with inhalant sensitization. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends the introduction of solid foods between the ages of 4 and 6 months. Study authors conclude that neither extended, exclusive breastfeeding, nor delaying the introduction of solid foods, may prevent allergic diseases in children. Source American Academy of Pediatrics .

Day Care Doubles Early Respiratory Problems, Does Not Prevent Later Asthma And Allergy

New research hints that the common belief that kids who go to daycare have lower rates of asthma and allergy later in life might be nothing more than wishful thinking. While young children in daycare definitely do get more illnesses and experience more respiratory symptoms as a result, any perceived protection these exposures afford against asthma and allergy seem to disappear by the time the child hits the age of eight. "We found no evidence for a protective or harmful effect of daycare on the development of asthma symptoms, allergic sensitization, or airway hyper-responsiveness at the age of eight years, " wrote Johan C de Jongste, M.D., Ph.D., of Erasmus University in the Netherlands and principle investigator of the study. "Early daycare was associated with more airway symptoms until the age of four years, and only in children without older siblings, with a transient decrease in symptoms between four and eight years." The results are published in the September 15 issue of the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, a journal of the American Thoracic Society.

Chlorinated Pools Increase Risk Of Allergic Diseases

Chlorine is effective at killing pathogens in swimming pools, but it also irritates the skin, eyes and upper respiratory tract of swimmers. Recent research has found swimming in outdoor or indoor chlorinated pools can increase asthma risks. The study, "Impact of Chlorinated Swimming Pool Attendance on the Respiratory Health of Adolescents" found that children who swam in chlorinated pools had a higher risk of asthma, as well as other allergic diseases such as hay fever and allergic rhinitis. Researchers in Belgium compared the health of adolescents who swam in chlorinated pools to adolescents who swam in pools sanitized with a concentration of copper and silver. In children with allergic sensitivities (atopy), exposure to chlorinated pools significantly increased the prevalence of asthma and respiratory allergies. Study authors suggest the chlorine-based oxidants in the water or just above the water cause changes in the airway and promote the development of allergic diseases. The findings reinforce the need for further research and to enforce regulations on the level of these chemicals in the water and air of swimming pools.

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