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Cracking The Code On Common Wrist Injury - American Academy Of Orthopaedic Surgeons

The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) recently approved and released an evidence-based clinical practice guideline on the Treatment of Distal Radius Fractures. A distal radius fracture - one of the most common fractures in the body - usually occurs as a result of a fall. For example, a fall may cause someone to land on his or her outstretched hands, breaking the larger of the two bones in the forearm, near the wrist. - In 2007, more than 261, 000 people visited the emergency room due to a distal radius fracture. "The Academy created this clinical practice guideline to improve patient care for those sustaining a distal radius fracture, " stated David Lichtman, MD, chair of this guideline workgroup.

AdvaCAL Calcium Effective Against Bone Loss In Postmenopausal Women

With Osteoporosis an increasing concern among women of all ages, a recent report in the medical journal Osteoporosis International found that women taking the AAACa (AdvaCAL® ) calcium supplements had the highest bone density increase among 32 different calcium studies conducted between 1977 and 2008. The 32 studies involved 3, 169 postmenopausal women, 79 skeletal measures and 7 different types of calcium, including dairy. The report entitled "The Effect of Calcium Supplementation on Bone Loss in 32 Controlled Trials in Postmenopausal Women" was authored by calcium researcher Christopher Nordin, M.D. of Australia. Nordin concluded that calcium intake prevented bone loss in postmenopausal women for at least four years.

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Risk For Bone Fractures In Older Women Increased By Diabetes Drug

A Henry Ford Hospital study finds women with type 2 diabetes who take a commonly prescribed class of medications to treat insulin resistance may be at a higher risk for developing bone fractures. After taking a thiazolidinedione (TZD) for one year, women are 50 percent more likely to have a bone fracture than patients not taking TZDs, according to study results. And those at the greatest risk for fractures from TZD use are women older than 65. "Older women are already at a higher risk of osteoporosis and osteoporosis-related fractures, which might explain why they appeared to be the most affected by TZDs, " says study senior author L. Keoki Williams, M.

New Pain Management Approaches Reduce Pain, Speed Recovery For Knee Or Hip Replacement

Patients undergoing knee or hip replacements recover more quickly when treated with targeted pain-blocking medications that may eliminate the need for general anesthesia during surgery and intravenous narcotics drugs after surgery. The February issue of Mayo Clinic Health Letter explains the newer pain management options and their benefits. A decade ago, patients undergoing hip or knee replacements were almost exclusively given general anesthesia during surgery and intravenous narcotic pain medications afterward. This approach works for most people and still is commonly practiced. But both general anesthesia and intravenous narcotic drugs can cause nausea, vomiting, grogginess, decreased bowel function and other side effects.

What Is Osteoarthritis? What Causes Osteoarthritis?

Osteoarthritis, also known as degenerative arthritis degenerative joint disease, OA, or osteoarthrosis, is a form of arthritis caused by inflammation, breakdown, and the eventual loss of cartilage in the joints - the cartilage wears down over time. Osteoarthritis is the most common type of arthritis. According to the National Health Service, UK, approximately 8.5 million people are affected by the condition. The Arthritis Foundation, USA, says that about 27 million Americans are affected. Osteoarthritis is a progressive disease; signs and symptoms gradually worsen over time. There is no cure. However, available therapies may help with pain and swelling (inflammation), as well as keeping the patient mobile and active.

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Little Effect Of Soy Isoflavones On Bone Loss In Postmenopausal Women: ISU Multi-Center Study

A previous six-month study by Iowa State University researchers had indicated that consuming modest amounts of soy protein, rich in isoflavones, lessened lumbar spine bone loss in midlife, perimenopausal women. But now an expanded three-year study by some of those same researchers does not show a bone-sparing effect in postmenopausal women who ingested soy isoflavone tablets, except for a modest effect at the femoral (hip) neck among those who took the highest dosage. The multi-center clinical trial of 224 postmenopausal women -- led by D. Lee Alekel, professor of nutrition and interim associate director of the Nutrition and Wellness Research Center (NWRC) at Iowa State, and supported by the National Institute of Arthritis, Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, one of the research institutes of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) -- was the longest ever conducted on the effects of soy isoflavones on bone mineral density (BMD).

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