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Severity, Duration Of Depression Associated With Risk Of Death Among Patients With Coronary Heart Disease

Among patients with both major depression and acute coronary syndrome, those with more severe depression within a few weeks of hospitalization for a cardiac event and those whose depression does not improve within six months appear to have more than double the risk of dying over a seven-year period, according to a report in the September issue of Archives of General Psychiatry, one of the JAMA/Archives journals. About one-fifth of individuals experience major depression in the first few weeks following a heart attack, according to background information in the article. Depression is associated with an increased risk of death after acute coronary syndrome, a term for cardiac events such as heart attack or unstable angina (chest pain).

Winners Of 2009 Research Grants Announced By Migraine Research Foundation

The Migraine Research Foundation (MRF), the only nonprofit organization devoted solely to funding migraine research, has announced the winners of the 2009 research grants. This year's grantees will explore such important areas as pediatric migraine, the genetic association between migraine and cardiovascular events, and why opioids enhance migraine pain. The six grants, totaling $300, 000, were selected by MRF and its distinguished medical advisory board from an unprecedented 34 proposals from 5 countries. "We were delighted with the depth and breadth of the work represented by these proposals. This is a testament to the enthusiasm and intellect of our researchers today, " said Cathy Glaser, co-founder and President of MRF.

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Blood Pressure Increased By Insomnia

Can't sleep at night? A new study published in the journal Sleep has found that people who suffer from insomnia have heightened nighttime blood pressure, which can lead to cardiac problems. The investigation, which measured the 24-hour blood pressure of insomniacs compared to sound sleepers, was conducted by researchers from the Università de Montrà al, its affiliated Hà pital du Sacrà -Coeur de Montrà al Sleep Disorders Centre and the Università Laval. "Over many years, chronic insomnia can have negative effects on the hearts of otherwise healthy individuals, " says lead author Paola A. Lanfranchi, a professor in the Università de Montrà al Faculty of Medicine and researcher at the Hà pital du Sacrà -Coeur de Montrà al Sleep Disorders Centre.

Heart Disease Patients Don't Take Their Medicines

At least a quarter of people with heart disease don't take vital medicines they have been prescribed to prevent heart attacks and strokes. Results of a study reported at the Royal Pharmaceutical Society's annual event, the British Pharmaceutical Conference in Manchester, confirm that doctors need to pay more attention to the way patients take their medicines, in line with recommendations in recent NICE guidance. In a study of 472 patients on the heart disease register of a large GP practice in North East England, 29% of patients failed to take medicines to prevent strokes and heart attacks regularly enough and 23% missed doses of statins to reduce their cholesterol.

Phase III Trial Tests Once-daily Edoxaban In Atrial Fibrillation

A major phase III trial - ENGAGE AF-TIMI 48 - is investigating once-daily treatment with the new oral factor Xa inhibitor edoxaban in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) with the potential for providing substantial improvements compared to the current standard of care in preventing stroke, specialists announced this week. ENGAGE AF-TIMI 48 is comparing two doses of edoxaban (30mg and 60mg once daily) with warfarin in patients with AF. "Approximately 16, 500 patients will be enrolled, from 1400 sites worldwide, " reported Robert Giugliano, Senior Investigator with the TIMI study group, and Associate Physician and Assistant Professor in Medicine, at Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, USA.

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Insomnia Is Bad For The Heart

Can't sleep at night? A new study published in the journal Sleep has found that people who suffer from insomnia have heightened night-time blood pressure, which can lead to cardiac problems. The investigation, which measured the 24-hour blood pressure of insomniacs compared to sound sleepers, was conducted by researchers from the Università de Montrà al, its affiliated Hà pital du Sacrà -Cour de Montrà al Sleep Disorders Centre and the Università Laval. "Over many years, chronic insomnia can have negative effects on the hearts of otherwise healthy individuals, " says lead author Paola A. Lanfranchi, a professor in the Università de Montrà al Faculty of Medicine and researcher at the Hà pital du Sacrà -Cour de Montrà al Sleep Disorders Centre.

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