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Greater Risks For Patients With Heart Attacks Posed By Crowded Emergency Departments

Patients with heart attacks and other forms of chest pain are three to five times more likely to experience serious complications after hospital admission when they are treated in a crowded emergency department (ED), according to a new study published in the journal Academic Emergency Medicine. The authors say that this dramatic difference in rates of serious complications underscores the need for action on the part of hospital administrators, policymakers and emergency physicians to find solutions to what has been termed "a national public health problem." More than six million patients per year come to U.S. emergency departments with chest pain.

Nanoparticle To Treat Cardiovascular Disease In Mice Tested By Reasearchers

Scientists and engineers at UC Santa Barbara and other researchers have developed a nanoparticle that can attack plaque - a major cause of cardiovascular disease. The new development is described in a recent issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. The treatment is promising for the eventual development of therapies for cardiovascular disease, which is blamed for one third of the deaths in the United States each year. Atherosclerosis, which was the focus of this study, is one of the leading causes of cardiovascular disease. In atherosclerosis, plaque builds up on the walls of arteries and can cause heart attack and stroke.

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QIO Support Accelerates Hospital Improvement In Heart Care, Researchers Find

The following is being issued by The American Health Quality Association (AHQA): Technical support provided by federally funded organizations operating in every state has had a substantial role in upgrading hospital care in the U.S. during a period when hospital performance improved faster than outpatient care, according to a new federal report. The annual National Healthcare Quality Report, just released by the U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), finds that essential treatment for Medicare patients with heart failure was provided 73.4% of the time in 2002, with that percentage jumping to 77.7% in 2004. From 2005 to 2006, for all payors, performance on two key heart failure measures improved from 88.

Stopping Fatty Change In Heart Cells

Heart failure is one of the world's most frequent causes of death - caused by conditions such as diabetes and obesity. With people who are overweight, the heart has to do more work in order to pump the blood through the circulatory system and this causes an increase in blood pressure. The heart itself becomes enlarged as the myocardial muscle cells increase in mass. To enable the heart to grow there also has to be an increased supply of energy and oxygen. However, the myocardial muscle cells suffer from a lack of oxygen and energy until such time as there are enough blood vessels to support the tissue. This is the critical moment in which the cells convert their metabolism.

Cordex Receives Special Protocol Assessment Approval From FDA For ATPace TM

Cordex Pharma, Inc. (OTC Bulletin Board: CDXP) announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved the design of pivotal, Phase 2b/3 clinical trials evaluating its lead product ATPace(TM) as an antiarrhytmic drug for the acute treatment of patients with paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia (PSVT) under the Special Protocol Assessment (SPA) process. ATPace(TM) is a novel stable liquid formulation of adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP). It is being developed as a therapeutic and diagnostic drug for the management of patients with cardiac arrhythmias. ATP has been used in Europe for more than five decades as the drug of choice for the acute termination of PSVT.

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World Heart Federation Warns That Burden Of Tobacco Epidemic Continues To Worsen Societies And Economies

G-20 leaders pledged to provide the International Monetary Fund with $500 billion to help struggling economies, sparking global controversy. Yet startling research shows that the combined costs of tobacco-related death and related productivity losses, healthcare expenditures, employee absenteeism, and widespread environmental harm are responsible for draining the same amount - $500 billion - from the global economy each year and it receives much less attention than it deserves. In recognition of World No Tobacco Day on 31st May, the World Heart Federation insists on bringing more attention to the impact of tobacco on health and disease. Tobacco use is the leading preventable cause of death and is closely linked to cardiovascular disease, which is the leading cause of death worldwide.

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