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Treatment Shows Excellent Results For Providence Tarzana Patients Following Cardiac Arrest

Less than two weeks after instituting new therapeutic hypothermia treatment for heart attack patients, Providence Tarzana Medical Center has applied the body-cooling treatment in three cases - and each patient showed remarkable neurologic recovery. Therapeutic hypothermia treatment, where cardiac arrest patients are cooled to 92 degrees, is being studied nationwide to help prevent brain damage caused by a loss of blood supply. Its initial use this month in the Providence Tarzana Emergency Department and intensive care units has been 100 percent successful. "With the institution of the protocol, in the first week-and-a-half, we've had three patients who have had complete recovery of neurologic function after prolonged cardiac arrest, " said G.

Complications Of Longstanding Type 1 Diabetes Halved By Intensive Glucose Control

Near-normal control of glucose beginning as soon as possible after diagnosis would greatly improve the long-term prognosis of type 1 diabetes, concludes a study published in the July 27, 2009, issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine, which updates information about the clinical course of type 1 diabetes. The study also found that the outlook for people with longstanding type 1 diabetes has greatly improved in the past 20 years due to a better understanding of the importance of intensive glucose control as well as advances in insulin formulations, insulin delivery, glucose monitoring, and the treatment of cardiovascular risk factors.

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By 2025 Cardiothoracic Surgeons Projected To Be In Short Supply

Health and population trends could increase demand for cardiothoracic surgeons in the United States far greater than the supply - diminishing and delaying care, according to a report in Circulation: Journal of the American Heart Association. A study undertaken by the Association of American Medical Colleges' (AAMC) Center for Workforce Studies found that the demand for cardiothoracic surgery services is projected to increase by 46 percent by 2025 (compared to 2005), while the supply of these surgeons is expected to decrease 21 percent during that period. The supply for cardiothoracic surgeons (physicians specially trained in surgeries of the heart and chest) is already dwindling, said Irving L.

World's First Cardiac Adult Stem Cell Patient Receives Infusion

Michael (Mike) Jones has become the world's first recipient of adult cardiac stem cells to treat congestive heart failure. Jones' infusion on July 17 marks the world's first phase-one FDA-approved clinical trial using adult cardiac stem cells to treat heart disease. The clinical trial is being conducted by a team of University of Louisville physicians at Jewish Hospital. During the infusion procedure, Jones was directly injected with his own cardiac stem cells into heart scar tissue using a minimally-invasive cardiac catheterization procedure, which reaches the heart through an artery in the patient's leg. The 66-year-old, self-employed man continues to recover following the outpatient procedure.

Heart Attack Damage May Be Reduced By New Drug

A new drug that targets a master disease-causing gene can dramatically reduce heart muscle damage after a heart attack and may lead to significantly improved patient outcomes, UNSW researchers have shown. The drug, known as Dz13, specifically targets and neutralises the gene responsible for inflammation and muscle death in the aftermath of a heart attack, preclinical trials have found. The drug also reduces incidental cell and tissue death resulting from life-saving interventions such as balloon angioplasty and stent placements used to open blocked arteries, or from the delivery of clot-busting drugs. Significantly, the heart's pumping action is protected by the drug, dramatically improving the patient's chances of a full recovery after a heart attack.

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Medtronic And Abbott Laboratories Resolve Global Vascular Patent Disputes

Medtronic, Inc. (NYSE: MDT) announced global resolution of all outstanding intellectual property litigation with Abbott Laboratories. Terms of the agreement stipulate that neither party will sue each other in the field of coronary stent and stent delivery systems for a period of at least 10 years, subject to certain conditions. The agreement includes a $400 million settlement payment to be made to Abbott and also results in a $42 million success payment to evYsio Medical Devices, LLC, as part of a Medtronic sublicense to Abbott of the evYsio stent design technology. In connection with the settlement, Medtronic expects to report in its first quarter financial results a special charge to be calculated in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles.

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