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Glucose Intolerance In Pregnancy Associated With Postpartum Cardiovascular Risk

Women who have gestational glucose intolerance (a condition less severe than gestational diabetes) exhibit multiple cardiovascular risk factors as early as three months after birth, according to a new study accepted for publication in The Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism (JCEM). Researchers in this study sought to evaluate the relationship between gestational glucose intolerance and postpartum risk of metabolic syndrome (defined as the clustering of several cardiometabolic risk factors including obesity, hypertension and low HDL cholesterol). Metabolic syndrome, like gestational diabetes itself, is associated with increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease.

Developed By Engineers, Doctors At UCLA - Novel Material That Could Help Fight Arterial Disease

A fortuitous discovery that grew out of a collaboration between UCLA engineers and physicians could potentially offer hope to the nearly 10 million Americans who suffer from peripheral arterial disease. Also known as hardening of the arteries, peripheral arterial disease, or PAD, is a common circulatory problem in which narrowed arteries reduce blood flow to the limbs. The condition is considered a red flag for vascular disease, heart attack and stroke, and its progression can result in the loss of limbs or death. While there are currently several treatments for PAD, including balloon angioplasty, stenting and bypass surgery, devices used in the latter two can frequently cause thrombosis, in which clots form inside blood vessels, obstructing blood flow and leading to serious complications.

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New Updates To AHA ACC SCAI Clinical Guidelines Recommend Treatment With Effient R For Patients With Acute Coronary Syndromes Managed With PCI

Effient(R) (prasugrel) tablets, a new antiplatelet medicine, was added as a treatment option in two clinical guideline updates: one for patients receiving percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) and a second one for patients with ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), or severe heart attack. The two 2009 focused updates for the clinical guidelines, jointly developed by the American Heart Association (AHA), the American College of Cardiology (ACC), and the Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions (SCAI), were published online today in Circulation, the Journal of the American College of Cardiology and Catheterization and Cardiovascular Interventions.

IV Drug Administration During Treatment For Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest Does Not Appear To Improve Long-Term Survival

Patients with an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest who received intravenous (IV) drug administration during treatment, recommended in life support guidelines, had higher rates of short term survival but no statistically significant improvement in survival to hospital discharge or long-term survival, compared to patients who did not receive IV drug administration, according to a study in the November 25 issue of JAMA. "Intravenous access and drug administration are integral parts of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) guidelines. Millions of patients have received epinephrine during advanced cardiac life support (ACLS) with little or no evidence of improved survival to hospital discharge, " the authors write.

Speeding Development Of Drug Treatments For Heart Failure With University Of Minnesota Invention

Research conducted by University of Minnesota scientists, in collaboration with Celladon Corporation, has led to the invention of technology to more rapidly identify compounds for the treatment of heart failure. Chronic heart failure is an increasingly important health problem. It is the leading medical cause of hospitalization and is expected to result in an estimated direct and indirect cost to the health care system of $37.2 billion in 2009 alone. About 5.7 million people in the United States have heart failure, and it contributes to or causes some 290, 000 deaths annually. However, developing new treatments is an extremely costly and time-consuming process, taking nearly a decade to gain regulatory approval and requiring hundreds of millions of dollars.

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Etiologic Factors Of Gastric Cardiac Adenocarcinoma Among Men In Taiwan

The gastric cardiac adenocarcinoma (GCA) is a very rare disease. In recent decades, however, the incidence of the GCA has increased dramatically in many Western countries. An increasing trend in GCA is also observed in municipal regions but not in rural regions of China. Another striking feature is the strong male predominance among patients with GCA. Some of the reasons above are still unclear and require further epidemiological investigations. A research article published on November 21, 2009 in the World Journal of Gastroenterology addresses this problem. A research team from Taiwan investigated the etiologic factors shared by lifestyles, diet, and other environmental exposures associated with GCA among men in Taiwan.

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