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Periodic Paralysis Study Reveals Gene Causing Disorder

Scientists have identified a gene underlying a disease that causes temporary paralysis of skeletal muscle. The finding, they say, illustrates how investigations of rare genetic diseases can drive insights into more common ones. The finding is reported in the January 8, 2010 issue of the journal Cell. The disease, known as thyrotoxic hypokalemic periodic paralysis, causes acute attacks of weakness in muscles that control movement. Symptoms range from difficulty grasping objects or rising from a lying position to incapacitating weakness of the body that prevents movement. The condition lasts from hours to days. Scientists have known that TPP occurs when certain people with an overactive thyroid are exposed to environmental stresses, such as resting of the muscles after exercise, stress, or low potassium levels in blood after eating a large carbohydrate meal.

URMC Study Links Vitamin D, Race, And Cardiac Deaths

Vitamin D deficiency may contribute to a higher number of heart and stroke-related deaths among black Americans compared to whites, according to a University of Rochester Medical Center study. The journal Annals of Family Medicine is publishing the study in the January-February edition, which goes online Jan. 11, 2010. Researchers sought to understand the well-documented disparity between blacks and whites in cardiovascular deaths. They turned to vitamin D because growing evidence links low serum levels of D to many serious illnesses including diabetes, hypertension, kidney and heart disease. Lead author Kevin Fiscella, M.D., said a complex host of genetic and lifestyle factors among blacks may explain why this population group has lower vitamin D levels across the lifespan than other races.

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Ipratropium Bromide May Increase Risk For Cardiovascular Events

Patients taking ipratropium bromide, an anticholinergic used in the treatment of COPD, may be at an increased risk for cardiovascular events (CVE), including heart failure. Researchers from the University of Washington in Seattle, WA, and Hines VA Hospital in Hines, IL, conducted a cohort study on 82, 717 US veterans with a new diagnosis of COPD between 1999 and 2002. Of the patients, 44 percent were exposed to anticholinergics (mainly ipratropium) at some time during the study. Patients were followed until they had their first hospitalization for a CVE, until they died, or until September 30, 2004. Within the cohort, 6, 234 CVE were identified (44 percent heart failure, 28 percent acute coronary syndrome, and 28 percent dysrhythmias).

Tiotropium Associated With Reduced Mortality

New research suggests that tiotropium, a long-acting anticholinergic used in patients with COPD, may be associated with a reduction in all-cause mortality, cardiovascular mortality, and cardiovascular events. Researchers from Caritas-St. Elizabeth Medical Center in Boston, MA, reviewed the outcomes of 30 completed clinical trials in the tiotropium project database. Within the trials, 10, 846 patients were treated with tiotropium and 8, 699 patients received a placebo. Results indicated that patients treated with tiotropium had lower incidence rates (IR) of all-cause mortality, cardiovascular mortality, and cardiovascular events (IR = 3.

How to Use Aerobic Exercises to Lose Weight! It Can Be Real Easy If You Realize This

In addition to the right diet you will also need the right exercises that help burn off that stubborn fat if you want to lose weight. Aerobic exercises can help you burn fat while building up stamina at the same time. Here are some vital tips that can help you use aerobic exercises to lose weight. Start out slowly and monitor your body... Before you get all fired up and sprain a muscle, start out slowly and monitor your body. Start with proper warming-up exercises to warm up your body and make it flexible. Keep an ear and eye out for clicking or painful joints and stop if you feel stabbing pain. You should also monitor your breathing initially, although you will certainly notice a positive difference after a few days of aerobics.

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Researchers Revisit Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension Survival

Setting out to determine the survival of patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), researchers at the University of Chicago Medical Center and their colleagues also discovered that an equation used for more than 20 years to predict survival is outdated. Accordingly, they developed and recently published a new survival prediction equation that will impact clinical practice and the drug development process. In PAH, the pulmonary arteries, which carry blood from the heart to the lungs to pick up oxygen, become restricted, forcing the lower right chamber of the heart to pump harder. This leads to shortness of breath, limited exercise capacity, fatigue, heart failure and death.

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